Terry Hatcher, PhD, REAT, RAS
Terry Hatcher, PhD, REAT, RAS
Anne Sagewood, MFT
Anne Sagewood, MFT
Victoria Stiefvater, MFT, NCC
Victoria Stiefvater, MFT, NCC

Our fees: $125 / session

SLIDING SCALES AVAILABLE

Dr. Terry Hatcher and Anne Sagewood accept credit cards.
Anne Sagewood takes insurance, and is on many panels.

Free 30 minute consultations

INTRODUCTION

The therapists at our Oakland and Berkeley sites are dedicated to offering the kind of high quality care that considers the whole person. We focus on the ways in which our clients' physical, spiritual, family and relationship issues affect their emotional and mental health through individual counseling and group therapy. We are an association of sole proprietor, private practice therapists who provide a wide variety of professional services for individuals, couples, families and groups. We are not a partnership, non-profit organization or a professional corporation. We refer clients to psychiatrists in Oakland and Berkeley for medication assessments. Therapists found on this site have specialties which include relationship counseling, working with mood disorders, anxiety, depression, addictions and stress disorders. Individual expressive arts therapy counseling and expressive art therapy groups are available in both our Oakland and Berkeley offices.

 

Anxiety & Depression Buddhist Psychology Eating Disorders Energy Psychology Expressive Art Therapy Grief & Loss Painting Your Personal Mythology Groups Relationship Counseling Spiritual Growth Substance Use Disorders Trauma & PTSD Resources Recommended Articles Recommended Books Recommended Movies Art Therapy Projects Suggestions For Better Mental Health


ANXIETY AND DEPRESSION

“You yourself, as much as anybody in the entire universe deserve your love and affection”
     Buddha (5th century BC Indian philosopher)

Anxiety disorders are the most common psychological illnesses affecting individuals today. They may develop from a complex set of risk factors including genetics, brain chemistry, personality and life events. They come in a variety of forms including Panic Disorder, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, Social Anxiety Disorder and specific phobias. Anxiety disorders are very treatable, with therapy, medication or both.

Depression or Depression-Related Mood Disorders can severely impact a person's quality of life, affect appetite, sleep, work, and relationships. Some of the symptoms may include constant feelings of sadness, irritability or tension; loss of energy, fatigue; significant weight loss or gain; insomnia or sleeping too much; inability to concentrate, feelings of guilt, worthlessness, hopelessness; or even thoughts of suicide or death. There are several types of Depression; Seasonal Affect Disorder, Postpartum Depression, Dysthymia, Bipolar Disorder and Major Depressive Disorder.

Psychotherapy, or 'talk therapy', is one of the most effective ways of treating Depression. Talking to a sympathetic and professional listener can help resolve symptoms; actually expressing what you feel can bring relief.

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Buddhist Psychology

“Watch your thoughts; they become your words.
  Watch your words; they become your actions.
  Watch your actions; they become your habits.
  Watch your habits; they become you character.
  Watch your character; it becomes your destiny”
Frank Outlaw (20th century American writer)

Buddhist Psychology's fundamental principle is that our basic nature is intrinsically healthy but our awareness of this is often obscured. Uncovering this health or basic goodness comes about by being present with whatever arises in the moment. Our actual experience then becomes the doorway to self -acceptance and authentic change. From a Buddhist perspective psychotherapy is not a matter of self-improvement but more a matter of releasing the temporary obstructions that thwart our ability to manifest our pure, wholesome, and intrinsic nature.

Grief, anger, pain, depression are part of the human experience; it is also part of the human experience to self protect, turn away, and resist these difficult emotions. Unfortunately the degree to which we are successful at separating ourselves from them is the degree to which we are also separated from our joy, contentment, and sense of well being. To make matters worse, anxiety, anger, and fear often fill the gap between our pain and our effort to separate from it.

Staying with our experience as it unfolds moment to moment can be one of the hardest things we'll ever do. Facing the emotional traumas embedded in the body requires intention, commitment, and a great deal of courage. In staying with our experience we learn to open to the actual quality of the feeling, instead of expending energy trying to control or reject our difficult feelings. We then learn to move with them, ride them out.

Since it is often not a matter of what happens to us, but how we respond to what happens to us, Buddhist Psychology views all suffering as an opportunity for growth and positive change. As a result of the fundamental belief in the self being basically healthy, psychotherapy from a Buddhist perspective shifts the focus away from pathology and towards our human potential.

Anxiety & Depression Buddhist Psychology Eating Disorders Energy Psychology Expressive Art Therapy Grief & Loss Painting Your Personal Mythology Groups Relationship Counseling Spiritual Growth Substance Use Disorders Trauma & PTSD Resources Recommended Articles Recommended Books Recommended Movies Art Therapy Projects Suggestions For Better Mental Health


EATING DISORDERS

“Not to laugh, not to lament, not to judge, but to understand”
      Baruch Spinoza (17th century Dutch philosopher)

Eating disorders have long been associated with teenage girls and young women, yet therapists report a growing number of older women are developing them or have masked them for years. Late on-set may be a result of women trying to cope with developmental issues, from empty nest and loss of a parent to re-socializing after a divorce. It appears that most cases can be traced back to an untreated or resurfacing eating disorder from adolescence. The number of boys and young men with this disorder is also increasing.

Most people with eating disorders share personality traits: low self-esteem, feelings of helplessness, and a fear of becoming fat. In anorexia, bulimia, and binge eating disorder, eating behaviors seem to develop as a way of handling stress and anxieties.

Eating disorders can include:

  • anorexia nervosa: an obsession with restricting the quantity of food one eats.
  • bulimia nervosa: consumption of large amounts of food and then purging.
  • binge eating: consumption of huge amounts of food without purging and resulting in obesity.
  • orthoexia nervosa: an obsession with eating "proper" foods.

Warning Signs

Concerned you or your loved one has an eating disorder? If the signs are there, it might be time to seek help. Eating disorders can be life threatening.

  • Diet - fad, yoyo or excessive dieting.
  • Dramatic weight loss.
  • Hair loss.
  • Preoccupation with thoughts of food.
  • Ritualistic eating, such as cutting food into tiny portions.
  • Excessive exercise.
  • Depression.
  • Social withdrawal.
  • Laxative abuse.
  • Extreme moodiness.
  • Skipping meals.
  • Intense fear of gaining weight or becoming fat.
  • Distorted body image.
  • Hiding or "stashing" food.
  • Continually limiting the number of foods eaten
Anxiety & Depression Buddhist Psychology Eating Disorders Energy Psychology Expressive Art Therapy Grief & Loss Painting Your Personal Mythology Groups Relationship Counseling Spiritual Growth Substance Use Disorders Trauma & PTSD Resources Recommended Articles Recommended Books Recommended Movies Art Therapy Projects Suggestions For Better Mental Health


ENERGY PSYCHOLOGY

“It’s never too late to be what you ought to have been”
      George Eliot (19th century British novelist)

What is Energy Psychology?

Einstein's famous equation, E=MC2, teaches us that physical matter is a form of energy. The idea that we can heal the body and the mind by working with energy is now being incorporated into medicine and psychology at a rapid rate.

Energy psychology is an innovative method stemming from cutting-edge developments in the fields of acupuncture, medicine, psychology, chiropractic, and kinesiology.

A family of mind-body therapies and self help techniques, Energy Psychology address what practitioners believe are disruptions in the energy that runs through and around your body. These disruptions appear to be the cause of emotional distress, negative thinking and unwanted behaviors.

Energy Psychology methods include working with the human energy systems using meridians, acupoints, chakras and the biofield. The work often involves self-tapping, eye movements or holding particular points on your own body.


How Does It Work?

Ever notice how you're not bothered or upset by something from the past unless you think about it? This is because simply bringing to mind an upsetting incident triggers an emotional response that creates neurological changes.

Once an emotional response is triggered, there is an opportunity to change the way you react. Although the exact mechanism isn't yet known, Energy Psychology intervenes during this window of opportunity and calms your response to the memory.

Clinical reports suggest that Energy Psychology methods are particularly effective with anxiety, depression, addictions, trauma, panic attacks, and phobias. And studies have shown dramatic changes in brain scans, indicating that Energy Psychology techniques bring about rapid and significant change at the neurological level.*

*Information above published by the Association for Comprehensive Energy Psychology. An international nonprofit organization promoting responsible Energy Psychology treatments and collaboration among practitioners, researchers, and licensing bodies.

Anxiety & Depression Buddhist Psychology Eating Disorders Energy Psychology Expressive Art Therapy Grief & Loss Painting Your Personal Mythology Groups Relationship Counseling Spiritual Growth Substance Use Disorders Trauma & PTSD Resources Recommended Articles Recommended Books Recommended Movies Art Therapy Projects Suggestions For Better Mental Health


EXPRESSIVE ART THERAPY

The arts offer a non-linear method to engage consciousness at its deepest levels. Music, journaling, dance, sculpture, poetry, drama, and visual arts can all be used as a avenue to greater understanding of one's personal unconscious myth by utilizing the mind and body in a conscious and deliberate way. This is not about being an artist, producing works of art or learning any techniques of art.

In an office setting drawing materials are an easy and effective way to begin the process of interpreting the symbolic language of the unconscious and allowing that knowledge to affect the habitual patterns in a client's daily life.

Drawing, guided visualization, journaling and movement work together to allow an in depth exploration of the psyche. Whether the client desires to challenge negative behavior patterns and/or promote inner growth and self awareness these methods work for a broad spectrum of age groups and personality types.

Expressive Art Therapy can move people out of their heads and into their bodies; out of their old negative self talk into a more liberated realm of self knowledge, self expression and creativity.

Anxiety & Depression Buddhist Psychology Eating Disorders Energy Psychology Expressive Art Therapy Grief & Loss Painting Your Personal Mythology Groups Relationship Counseling Spiritual Growth Substance Use Disorders Trauma & PTSD Resources Recommended Articles Recommended Books Recommended Movies Art Therapy Projects Suggestions For Better Mental Health


GRIEF AND LOSS

“Although the world is full of suffering, it is also full of the overcoming of it”
      Helen Keller (20th century American writer)

Grief and loss are normal life experiences for human beings at any age. For those of the Baby Boomer Generation and older, life can involve confronting multiple losses: the death of parents and peers; children leaving home; the loss of a partner due to death or divorce; changes in income due to retirement or job loss; loss of sexual pleasure due to changes in sexual appetite and functioning and loss of meaning due to changes in established roles and activities. All of these losses bring up the question of what to do with the empty spaces within and without. Creating a warm and loving relationship with a therapist can alleviate some of the symptoms, such as isolation, substance abuse, loss of appetite, promiscuity, sleep disorders, depression, illnesses and suicidal ideation.

Anxiety & Depression Buddhist Psychology Eating Disorders Energy Psychology Expressive Art Therapy Grief & Loss Painting Your Personal Mythology Groups Relationship Counseling Spiritual Growth Substance Use Disorders Trauma & PTSD Resources Recommended Articles Recommended Books Recommended Movies Art Therapy Projects Suggestions For Better Mental Health


RELATIONSHIP COUNSELING

“If we change within, our outer life will change also”
      Jean Shinoda Bolen (20th century American writer)

For some people relationship is the means by which learning and growth happen. Relationships with a spouse, parents, children, siblings, friends and relatives are central in their lives. When there is dysfunction in these very important connections, hurt, anger and sorrow are often the result. The therapeutic relationship can be a safe place to learn and practice new and effective communication skills. These skills create pathways through difficult issues such as parenting and disciplining children, finances, sex, and power struggles by developing empathy and understanding of the other.

Anxiety & Depression Buddhist Psychology Eating Disorders Energy Psychology Expressive Art Therapy Grief & Loss Painting Your Personal Mythology Groups Relationship Counseling Spiritual Growth Substance Use Disorders Trauma & PTSD Resources Recommended Articles Recommended Books Recommended Movies Art Therapy Projects Suggestions For Better Mental Health


SPIRITUAL GROWTH

“Be attentive to what is arising within you, and place that above everything else…what is happening is your innermost self is worthy of your entire love; somehow you must find a way to work at it”
      Rainer Maria Rilke (20th century German poet)

Whether you already have a spiritual practice or religious tradition, working with therapists that have a capacity for spiritual and religious understanding through their own practice and experience can open new depths of meaning in your spiritual and/or religious life. Psychology comes from the word psyche, meaning Soul. Psychology then is a doorway to this deeper knowledge of your own Soul. Learning to live from this more authentic self one moment at a time, can allow you to slow down and enjoy the fullness of being human.

Anxiety & Depression Buddhist Psychology Eating Disorders Energy Psychology Expressive Art Therapy Grief & Loss Painting Your Personal Mythology Groups Relationship Counseling Spiritual Growth Substance Use Disorders Trauma & PTSD Resources Recommended Articles Recommended Books Recommended Movies Art Therapy Projects Suggestions For Better Mental Health


SUBSTANCE USE DISORDERS

“When you do a thing do it with all your might. Put your whole soul into it. Stamp it with your personality. Be active, be energetic, be enthusiastic and faithful and you will accomplish your object”
      Ralph Waldo Emerson (19th century American writer)

Alcoholism, drug dependence and addiction, known as Substance Use Disorders, are complex problems. People with these disorders were once thought to have a character defect, moral weakness or impoverishment of will. Some people still mistakenly believe that. However, most scientists and medical researchers now consider dependence on alcohol or drugs to be a long term illness or brain disease, like asthma, hypertension (high blood pressure) or diabetes.

Substance Use Disorder is an illness that can affect anyone. No one knows for sure exactly what causes it but the chance of developing a Substance Use Disorder depends partly on genetics or biological traits passed down through families. A person's environment, psychological traits and stress levels also play major roles by contributing to the use of alcohol or drugs. PTSD (Post Traumatic Stress Disorder), especially in women and soldiers returning from battle, is often a precursor to Substance Use Disorder.

People who start using alcohol and/or drugs early in life run a greater risk of developing Substance Use Disorder. Using drugs and alcohol for a long time changes the brain in important and long lasting ways; ways that often include dependency.

Even though an individual or a family member has an illness it doesn't excuse the negative behavior that often accompanies the disorder. No one is at fault for having a disease but they are responsible for getting treatment.

Psychotherapy can help the individual with alcohol abuse or drug abuse issues repair the often damaged relationships with self, friends and family, as well as build new relationships with people who don't use drugs and alcohol.

We work with people who have made a commitment to their sobriety and have been clean and sober for at least one year.

Anxiety & Depression Buddhist Psychology Eating Disorders Energy Psychology Expressive Art Therapy Grief & Loss Painting Your Personal Mythology Groups Relationship Counseling Spiritual Growth Substance Use Disorders Trauma & PTSD Resources Recommended Articles Recommended Books Recommended Movies Art Therapy Projects Suggestions For Better Mental Health


TRAUMA AND PTSD

“You are not responsible for being down but you are responsible for getting up”
      Jesse Jackson (20th century American political leader)

PTSD stands for "post-traumatic stress disorder" - a set of emotional problems that can occur after someone has experienced a terrible, stressful life event.

Trauma is defined as an event outside your control in which you experienced or witnessed a physical threat, (e.g. sexual abuse, physical abuse, war combat, seeing someone killed, surviving a natural disaster, a car accident).

Responses to trauma often include intense helplessness, fear, or horror. (Or if you were a child at the time, agitated disorganized behavior.)

After the trauma, some of these symptoms can appear:

  • intrusion: the trauma comes back into mind even when you don't want it to, as in nightmares, flashbacks or images.
  • avoidance: numbing, feel detached, avoiding any reminders of the trauma.
  • arousal: feeling "hyped up" (e.g. easily startled, sleep problems, anger.)
  • lower functioning: problems with relationships, work or other major areas in life.


There are two types of PTSD. 'Simple PTSD' is from a single incident (such as a car accident or hurricane), usually as an adult. 'Complex PTSD' is from repeated incidents such as domestic violence or on-going child abuse. It has a broader range of symptoms, including problems with self-harm, suicide, dissociation ("losing time"), relationships, memory, sexuality, health, anger, shame, guilt, numbness, loss of faith and trust, and feeling damaged.

PTSD is considered an anxiety disorder because it is marked by an overwhelming feeling of anxiety during or after the trauma. It is a psychiatric illness, but it is definitely possible to heal from it. New insights into this disorder are continually being discovered due to more sophisticated technology in the field of neuroscience (the study of brain functioning.)

PTSD often occurs with other disorders such as depression, substance abuse, panic attacks, anxiety, agoraphobia (anxiety about, or avoidance, of places or situations from which escape might be difficult), obsessive-compulsive, and bipolar (marked mood swings).

PTSD can affect anyone exposed to trauma, not just war veterans View Full Story

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RESOURCES

“In the time of your life, live”
      William Saroyan (20th century American writer)

Women's Therapy Services
"Experienced, licensed women psychotherapists and registered interns offering individual and couples psychotherapy. Office are located in San Francisco, Marin, and Palo Alto. Our commitment is to serve the needs of women in the Bay Area coming from diverse backgrounds, cultures, ages, and economic needs."
www.womenstherapyservices.com

Anxiety & Depression Buddhist Psychology Eating Disorders Energy Psychology Expressive Art Therapy Grief & Loss Painting Your Personal Mythology Groups Relationship Counseling Spiritual Growth Substance Use Disorders Trauma & PTSD Resources Recommended Articles Recommended Books Recommended Movies Art Therapy Projects Suggestions For Better Mental Health


Anxiety & Depression Buddhist Psychology Eating Disorders Energy Psychology Expressive Art Therapy Grief & Loss Painting Your Personal Mythology Groups Relationship Counseling Spiritual Growth Substance Use Disorders Trauma & PTSD Resources Recommended Articles Recommended Books Recommended Movies Art Therapy Projects Suggestions For Better Mental Health


Recommended Books

“Each of us is two selves, and the great challenge of life is to try to keep that higher self in command”
       Martin Luther King Jr. (20th century American leader)

Highly Recommended Reading:

When Things Fall Apart By Pema Chödrön, Shambhala Publications
When Things Fall Apart
By Pema Chödrön

Description of When Things Fall Apart

The beautiful practicality of her teaching has made Pema Chödrön one of the most beloved of contemporary American spiritual authors among Buddhists and non-Buddhists alike. A collection of talks she gave between 1987 and 1994, the book is a treasury of wisdom for going on living when we are overcome by pain and difficulties. Chödrön discusses:

  • Using painful emotions to cultivate wisdom, compassion, and courage
  • Communicating so as to encourage others to open up rather than shut down
  • Practices for reversing habitual patterns
  • Methods for working with chaotic situations
  • Ways for creating effective social action
Shambhala Publications

Reviews of When Things Fall Apart

"Pema Chodron is one of those spiritual teachers who brings ancient wisdom to bear upon our daily triumphs and tragedies. . . . Incredibly wise and poignantly practical."— Spirituality & Health

"Chödrön's book is filled with useful advice about how Buddhism helps readers to cope with the grim realities of modern life, including fear, despair, rage and the feeling that we are not in control of our lives . . . Chödrön demonstrates how effective the Buddhist point of view can be in bringing order into disordered lives."
Publishers Weekly

"This is a book that could serve you for a lifetime."— Natural Health

As one of Pema Chödrön's grateful students, I have been learning the most pressing and necessary lesson of all: how to keep opening wider my own heart."—Alice Walker

 

Highly Recommended Reading:

The Places That Scare You
By Pema Chödrön

Description of The Places That Scare You

We always have a choice, Pema Chödrön teaches: We can let the circumstances of our lives harden us and make us increasingly resentful and afraid, or we can let them soften us and make us kinder. Here Pema provides the tools to deal with the problems and difficulties that life throws our way. This wisdom is always available to us, she teaches, but we usually block it with habitual patterns rooted in fear. Beyond that fear lies a state of openheartedness and tenderness. This book teaches us how to awaken our basic goodness and connect with others, to accept ourselves and others complete with faults and imperfections, and to stay in the present moment by seeing through the strategies of ego that cause us to resist life as it is.

Shambhala Publications

Reviews of The Places That Scare You

"Chödrön has once again proven herself to be one of the very best working in this field."— Library Journal

"Chödrön demonstrates how effective the Buddhist point of view can be in bringing order into disordered lives."
Publishers Weekly

"A lively and accessible take on ancient techniques for transforming terror and pain into joy and compassion."
O: The Oprah Magazine

 

Highly Recommended Reading:

It's Up To You
By Dzigar Kongtrül

Description of It's Up to You

On the spiritual path we speak of enlightenment. But how do we reconcile the idea of enlightenment with what we see when we look in the mirror—when insecurities, doubts, and self-centered tendencies arise in our minds? Dzigar Kongtrül suggests that we need not feel “doomed” when these experiences surface. In fact, such experiences are not a problem if we are able to simply let them arise without judging them or investing them with so much meaning. This approach to experience is what Kongtrül calls self-reflection.

Self-reflection is a practice, a path, and an attitude. It is the spirit of taking an interest in that which we usually try to push away. When we practice self-reflection we take liberation into our own hands and accept the challenge and personal empowerment in Kongtrül’s title: it’s up to you.

Shambhala Publications

Reviews of It's Up to You

“Kongtrül Rinpoche brings an unflinching and fresh perspective.”— The Beacon

 “Kongtrül is an innovative teacher who is successfully transposing Buddhism in a Western key.”— Shambhala Sun

“Dzigar Kongtrül Rinpoche has written an enthralling and practical book that speaks to us all with an exceptional clarity about confusion, uncertainty, and fear, about fearlessness and courage, and about awareness, joy, sanity, and freedom.”—Sogyal Rinpoche, author of The Tibetan Book of Living and Dying

“Like Dzigar Kongtrül himself, this book is warm, direct, and potent. Its intimacy is transformative.”
—Sakyong Mipham Rinpoche, author of Turning the Mind into an Ally

Anxiety & Depression Buddhist Psychology Eating Disorders Energy Psychology Expressive Art Therapy Grief & Loss Painting Your Personal Mythology Groups Relationship Counseling Spiritual Growth Substance Use Disorders Trauma & PTSD Resources Recommended Articles Recommended Books Recommended Movies Art Therapy Projects Suggestions For Better Mental Health


RECOMMENDED MOVIES

“Life is never what one dreams. It is seldom what one desires, but, for the eager mind, the future will always hold the search for buried treasure and the possibility of high adventure”
Ellen Glasgow (20th century American novelist)
Relevant to PTSD: Beloved (1998)
Streetwise (1998)
The Great Santini (1980)
This Boy’s Life (1993)
Ponette (1996)
The Celebration (1998)
What’s Love Got To Do With It? (1993)
Precious (2009)
A Wayfarer’s Journey: Listening to Mahler (2007)
Prince of Tides (1991)
Good Will Hunting (1997)
Ordinary People (1980)
Nuts (1987)
The War Zone (1999)
Relevant to Mental Health:Mr. Jones (1998)
Three Faces of Eve (1957)
What About Bob? (1991)
Nobody’s Child (1986)
Lars and the Real Girl (2007)
An Angel at My Table (1990)
Shine (1996)
Analyze This (1999)
Analyze That (2002)
Relevant to Substance Abuse:When a Man Loves A Woman (1994)
Leaving Las Vegas (1995)
The Lost Weekend (1945)
Trainspotting (1996)
Clean and Sober (1988)
28 Days (2000)
Days of Wine and Roses (1962)
Affliction (1998)
Basketball Diaries (1995)
Panic In Needle Park (1971)
 
Anxiety & Depression Buddhist Psychology Eating Disorders Energy Psychology Expressive Art Therapy Grief & Loss Painting Your Personal Mythology Groups Relationship Counseling Spiritual Growth Substance Use Disorders Trauma & PTSD Resources Recommended Articles Recommended Books Recommended Movies Art Therapy Projects Suggestions For Better Mental Health


Anxiety & Depression Buddhist Psychology Eating Disorders Energy Psychology Expressive Art Therapy Grief & Loss Painting Your Personal Mythology Groups Relationship Counseling Spiritual Growth Substance Use Disorders Trauma & PTSD Resources Recommended Articles Recommended Books Recommended Movies Art Therapy Projects Suggestions For Better Mental Health


Anxiety & Depression Buddhist Psychology Eating Disorders Energy Psychology Expressive Art Therapy Grief & Loss Painting Your Personal Mythology Groups Relationship Counseling Spiritual Growth Substance Use Disorders Trauma & PTSD Resources Recommended Articles Recommended Books Recommended Movies Art Therapy Projects Suggestions For Better Mental Health